An Independent National Adaptation Programme for England

The purpose of this policy brief is to contribute to the National Adaptation Programme that is currently under preparation by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. The Climate Change Act (Her Majesty’s Government, 2008) requires the Government to put in place, and update every five years, a National Adaptation Programme (NAP), which addresses climate change risks. This policy brief aims to contribute to this process by offering an analytical framework and formulating a rational basis for thinking about adaptation.

Evaluation of the Impact of Floods and Associated Protection Policies

Aim of the project is: identifiy and quantify damage of floods, evaluate and compare preventive and curative measures, characterise costs and benefits associated to policy options.

Probabilistic spatial risk assessment of heat impacts and adaptations for London

This study utilises high spatial resolution probabilistic projections of urban temperatures along with projections of demographic change, to provide a probabilistic risk assessment of heat impacts on urban society. The study focuses on Greater London and the surrounding region, assessing mortality risk, thermal discomfort in residential buildings, and adaptation options within an integrated framework.

Part III: Annexes to Impact Assessment Guidelines

These Guidelines are for Commission staff preparing impact assessments. They consist of a core text (this document) and annexes. The core text explains what IA is, presents the key actors, sets out the procedural rules for preparing, carrying out and presenting an IA, and gives guidance on the analytical steps to follow in the IA work. The Annexes deliver more support.

Impact Assessment Guidelines

These Guidelines are for Commission staff preparing impact assessments. They consist of a core text (this document) and annexes. The core text explains what IA is, presents the key actors, sets out the procedural rules for preparing, carrying out and presenting an IA, and gives guidance on the analytical steps to follow in the IA work.

ECCONET Deliverable 4.1: Literature Review of Previous Projects and Studies on the Economic Effects of Climate Change on Inland Waterway Transport

A review of the available and relevant literature on economic effects of climate change on inland waterway transport allows us to paint a clear picture of the type of output ECCONET can produce and the kind of results that can be expected.

ECCONET Deliverable 4.2: Cost Effectiveness of Inland Waterway Transport

This deliverable D4.2 complements the information available in several ways: 1. We analyse the decisions of individual skippers to invest in adaptation, based on a plausible increase in carrying capacity during the ship’s lifetime. This is only possible for technical and operational measures (I). 2. We combine the effects of prediction methods (III) and torekeeping/relocation (IV). In fact, we study the link between improved prediction and savings in storekeeping. 3. We provide a short discussion on the presence of learning effects in the IWT sector

Climate Change and Agriculture: Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation

The report refers to impacts of climate changes on agriculture, mitigation of greenhouse gases and adaptation responses.

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of Regulation

This Study on the costs and benefits of regulation was prepared by the Centre for European Policy Studies and Economisti Associati for the Secretariat General of the European Commission, and looks specifically at current methods used to assess the costs and benefits of regulation. The report is expected to provide an input to the upcoming revision of the IA guidelines of the European Commission by providing insights on how to strengthen the identification and quantification of costs and benefits in impact assessment.

Simplified guidelines for Social Cost-Benefit Analysis of Climate Change adaptation projects on a local scale

This guidance intends to build the capacity of local governments and NGOs to undertake such analyses, by presenting a simplified evaluative framework. It focuses primarily on climate change adaptation interventions, but can also be useful for appraising and evaluating development projects more broadly (e.g. health interventions, education programmes, etc.). This guidance follows a case-study approach whereby we present elements of our recent application of CBA to community-based adaptation in Niger in order to illustrate the process step-by-step.

Pages