Cities and flooding. A guide to integrated urban flood risk management for the 21st Century

The guide serves as a primer for decision and policy makers, technical specialists, central, regional and local government officials, and concerned stakeholders in the community sector, civil society and non-governmental organizations, and the private sector. The Guide embodies the state-of-the art on integrated urban flood risk management. The Guide starts with a summary for policy makers which outlines and describes the key areas which policy makers need to be knowledgeable about to create policy directions and an integrated strategic approach for urban flood risk management.

Adapting to climate change with water savings and water reuse

Climate change due to global warming will reduce river flows across much of Australia and reduce the yield of existing urban and rural water systems. These reductions are additional to yield reductions that have flowed from the allocation of more water for environmental flows under national water reforms, and the severity of the 2001-2007 drought in southern Australia.

Give and take: How the funding of adaptation to climate change can improve the donor’s terms-of-trade.

This paper discusses the interplay between international trade, regional adaptation to climate change and financial transfers for funding adaptation. It combines insights from a theoretical model of North-to-South transfers with the findings of a calibrated dynamic multi-region multi-sector computable general equilibrium model that takes into account the impacts of climate change and the adaptation to it. Assessing the effects of adaptation funding indicates that funding of adaptation in developing regions can be Pareto-improving.

The Costs of Adaptation to Climate Change for Water Infrastructure in OECD Countries

There is concern that climate change may greatly increase the costs of providing water infrastructure in rich countries, but the estimates available cannot be compared across countries. This paper develops and applies a top-down approach to estimate the costs of adapting to climate change on a consistent basis for different climate scenarios. The analysis separates (a) the costs of maintaining service standards for a baseline projection of demand, and (b) the costs of changes in water use and infrastructure as a consequence of changes in climate patterns.

Impacts of climate change on lower Murray irrigation

This article evaluates irrigated agriculture sector response and resultant economic impacts of climate change for a part of the Murray Darling Basin in Australia. A water balance model is used to predict reduced basin inflows for mild, moderate and severe climate change scenarios involving 1, 2 and 4 C warming, and predict 13, 38 and 63% reduced inflows. Impact on irrigated agricultural production and profitability are estimated with a mathematical programming model using a two-stage approach that simultaneously estimates short and long-run adjustments.

Measuring climatic impacts on energy consumption: A review of the empirical literature

This paper reviews the literature on the relationship between climate and the energy sector. In particular,we primarily discuss empirical papers published in peer-reviewed economics journals focusing on how climate affects energy expenditures and consumption. Climate will affect energy consumption by changing how consumers respond to short run weather shocks (the intensive margin) as well as how people will adapt in the long run (the extensivemargin).

The scope for adaptation to climate change : what can we learn from the impact literature?

Neither the costs nor the benefits of adaptation to climate change have been systematically studied so far. This paper discusses the extent to which the vast body of literature on climate change impacts can provide insights into the scope and likely cost of adaptation. The ways in which the impacts literature deals with adaptation can be grouped into four categories: no adaptation, arbitrary adaptation, observed adaptation (analogues), and modeled adaptation (optimization). All four cases are characterized by the simple assumptions made about the mechanisms of adaptation.

The Role of Environmental Management and eco-engineering in Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

This report by ProAct Network and Gaia Group reviews a growing body of evidence that sound environmental management has a potentially important role to play in reducing many of the risks posed by natural hazards. Many ecosystems – if they are intact and/or well managed – act as natural, dynamic barriers that absorb the force of certain hazards, protect vulnerable communities and their assets while at the same time preserve local biodiversity and encourage ecological productivity. Natural ecosystems thus play an important protective and productive role in many instances.

Climate Change and Agriculture: Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation

The report refers to impacts of climate changes on agriculture, mitigation of greenhouse gases and adaptation responses.

Simplified guidelines for Social Cost-Benefit Analysis of Climate Change adaptation projects on a local scale

This guidance intends to build the capacity of local governments and NGOs to undertake such analyses, by presenting a simplified evaluative framework. It focuses primarily on climate change adaptation interventions, but can also be useful for appraising and evaluating development projects more broadly (e.g. health interventions, education programmes, etc.). This guidance follows a case-study approach whereby we present elements of our recent application of CBA to community-based adaptation in Niger in order to illustrate the process step-by-step.

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