Cost-benefit analysis in climate change adaptation: the use of participatory methodologies

Cost-benefit analysis, as an economic evaluation tool of public or private projects, has evolved significantly in the last 200 years following the developments in terms of economics, namely Environmental Economic, and developments in project analysis and public policy evaluation.

Adaptation to sea level rise: Calculating costs and benefits for the case study Kalundborg, Denmark

Rising sea levels are expected to cause an increased risk of coastal flooding in many regions and adaptation to these threats is necessary to avoid considerable losses. Yet, such measures will typically only be implemented if they are economically efficient, that is, if the benefits in terms of avoided damages exceed the implementation costs. By employing extreme value theory we perform a cost-benefit analysis for a specific protection measure in a case study region in Kalundborg (Denmark) and calculate the amortisation times for several sea level scenarios and discount rates.

Adaptation to extreme rainfall with open drainage system: An integrated hydrological cost-benefit analysis.

This paper presents a cross-disciplinary framework for assessment of climate change adaptation to increased precipitation extremes considering pluvial flood risk as well as additional environmental services provided by some of the adaptation options. The ability of adaptation alternatives to cope with extreme rainfalls is evaluated using a quantitative flood risk approach based on urban inundation modeling and socio-economic analysis of corresponding costs and benefits. A hedonic valuation model is applied to capture the local economic gains or losses from more water bodies in green areas.

Climate change uncertainty: building flexibility into water and flood risk infrastructure

Infrastructure for water, urban drainage and flood protection has a typical lifetime of 30–200 years and its continuing performance is very sensitive to climate change. Investment decisions for such systems are frequently based on state-of-the-art impact assessments using a specified climate change scenario in order to identify a singular optimal adaptive strategy. In a non-stationary world, however, it is risky and/or uneconomic to plan for just one climate change scenario as an average or best estimate, as is done with the use of the Predict-Then-Adapt method.

Adaptation Inspiration Book: 22 implemented cases of local climate change adaptation to inspire European citizens

To show the progress in Europe on adaptation to climate change and to showcase inspirational and daring adaptation projects ERANET CIRCLE-2 works on a bold and visual inspiration book with good practices of implementation of adaptation strategies and projects in Europe. While most people may have a rough comprehension of climate change, the phrase adaptation often invites only raised eyebrows. What is adaptation? How do you define it and what does it look like?

Cities and flooding. A guide to integrated urban flood risk management for the 21st Century

The guide serves as a primer for decision and policy makers, technical specialists, central, regional and local government officials, and concerned stakeholders in the community sector, civil society and non-governmental organizations, and the private sector. The Guide embodies the state-of-the art on integrated urban flood risk management. The Guide starts with a summary for policy makers which outlines and describes the key areas which policy makers need to be knowledgeable about to create policy directions and an integrated strategic approach for urban flood risk management.

Copenhagen Climate Adaptation Plan

With this climate adaptation plan we will outline the challenges the city faces in the short and medium terms as a result of changes we expect in the future climate. We will also identify those solutions that, based on our present-day knowledge, appear to be most appropriate and reveal the opportunities climate change may also present to the city. We do not yet know all the consequences climate change will have for Copenhagen, but we will continuously implement the measures required for Copenhagen to continue to be a safe and attractive city to live and spend time in.

Climate change and coastal flooding in Metro Boston: impacts and adaptation strategies

Sea level rise (SLR) due to climate change will increase storm surge height along the 825 km long coastline of Metro Boston, USA. Land at risk consists of urban waterfront with piers and armoring, residential areas with and without seawalls and revetments, and undeveloped land with either rock coasts or gently sloping beachfront and low-lying coastal marshes. Risk-based analysis shows that the cumulative 100 year economic impacts on developed areas from increased storm surge flooding depend heavily upon the adaptation response, location, and estimated sea level rise.

Adaptation to Flooding in Urban Areas: An Economic Primer

New Orleans and Bangkok are vivid examples of major urban areas recently affected by massive inundations of floodwaters. The pending effects of climate change may exacerbate this problem; yet, local decision makers lack a clear and consistent framework for analyzing the costs and benefits of alternative modes of adaptation. This article offers a primer on the economic analysis of three distinct modes of adaptation, with a view to assist planners in determining the best course of action for their respective cities.

The value of disappearing beaches: A hedonic pricing model with endogenous beach width

Beach nourishment is a policy used to rebuild eroding beaches with sand dredged from other locations. Previous studies indicate that beach width positively affects coastal property values, but these studies ignore the dynamic features of beaches and the feedback that nourishment has on shoreline retreat. We correct for the resulting attenuation and endogeneity bias in a hedonic property value model by instrumenting for beach width using spatially varying coastal geological features.

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