Climate change uncertainty: building flexibility into water and flood risk infrastructure

Infrastructure for water, urban drainage and flood protection has a typical lifetime of 30–200 years and its continuing performance is very sensitive to climate change. Investment decisions for such systems are frequently based on state-of-the-art impact assessments using a specified climate change scenario in order to identify a singular optimal adaptive strategy. In a non-stationary world, however, it is risky and/or uneconomic to plan for just one climate change scenario as an average or best estimate, as is done with the use of the Predict-Then-Adapt method.

Report on the Estimated Cost of Adaptation Options Under Climate Uncertainty

This report describes the CEA methodology and how we have implemented this in CLIMSAVE. We address key methodological issues referring to uncertainty and report in detail on specific topics. We conclude with insights gained and proposals for the further development of the CEA methodology.

Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation: Quantify the Cost of Impacts and Adaptation

The aim of this project is to advance knowledge of the costs of climate change in the UK, by generating initial estimates of the welfare effects associated with specific impacts occurring under a range of climate change and socioeconomic scenarios for the UK. To the extent possible, it also indicates how and where the burden of these welfare affects may fall. In order to generate robust results, that will facilicate adaptation assessment, a primarily bottom-up approach based on local, regional and national case studies in a range of key impact sectors is adopted.

Adaptation to Climate Change: Needs and Opportunities in Southeast Asia

This paper focuses on the adaptation strategies of developing countries and the possible adaptation options available for Southeast Asia. Adaptation refers to the actions taken by individuals, communities, or governments in response to climate change, to reduce the adverse impacts or to take advantage of opportunities offered by such changes. Adaptation strategies have hardly been considered by many Southeast Asian countries in as recently as two or three years ago.

The scope for adaptation to climate change : what can we learn from the impact literature?

Neither the costs nor the benefits of adaptation to climate change have been systematically studied so far. This paper discusses the extent to which the vast body of literature on climate change impacts can provide insights into the scope and likely cost of adaptation. The ways in which the impacts literature deals with adaptation can be grouped into four categories: no adaptation, arbitrary adaptation, observed adaptation (analogues), and modeled adaptation (optimization). All four cases are characterized by the simple assumptions made about the mechanisms of adaptation.

Climate change and adaptation : the case of Nigerian agriculture

The present research offers an economic assessment of climate change impacts on the four major crop families characterizing Nigerian agriculture, covering more than 80% of agricultural value added. The evaluation is performed shocking land productivity in a computable general equilibrium model tailored to replicate Nigerian economic development until the mid of this century. The detail of land uses in the model has been also increased differentiating land types per agro ecological zones.

The economics of climate change in the Pacific

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) conducted this study of the economics of climate change in the Pacific to assist its Pacific developing member countries (DMCs) in adapting to climate risks. After an extensive review of past and ongoing research efforts on climate change, the study focused on identifying and quantifying its economic impacts on the Pacific DMCs. It used the best available methodological tools to assess adverse effects of climate change particularly on agriculture; on fisheries and coral reefs; on tourism; and on the health and well-being of the populace.

Compendium on methods and tools to evaluate impacts of, and vulnerability and adaptation to, climate change

In 1999, the UNFCCC Secretariat took a first step towards disseminating information on methods and tools when it produced a report entitled Compendium of Decision Tools to Evaluate Strategies for Adaptation to Climate Change. Since then, the adaptation assessment process has changed considerably and in some ways grown more sophisticated. The UNFCCC Secretariat has subsequently updated the original compendium and broadened its scope.

MEDIATION and the Adaptation Challenge: Identifying appropriate methods and tools to support climate change adaptation decision making.

The MEDIATION project guides researchers, policy advisors and experts to suitable climate change adaptation methods and tools for a wide range of questions and from various disciplines and perspectives. The project involves 11 partners and 11 case studies. Summaries of five of these case studies can be found in the present publication. Further information on the MEDIATION methodology, Adaptation Platform and training materials, which were developed for experts with basic technical or scientific knowledge rather than the general public,

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